Wednesday, September 19, 2007

Another way of serving haggis, neeps & tatties



That's exactly how I saw haggis, neeps & tatties served at Peckhams on Nicholson Street in Edinburgh earlier this month (see photo here). I dined there with my friend Melinda on my first night in town, and I simply had to try this at home. Not bad, not bad at all :)

My sauce is a bit different, however - although unconventional, I want my haggis with a caramelised onion gravy.

MacSween of Edinburgh haggis is one food-related thing I miss from Scotland every now and then...

21 comments:

neil said...

Everything is better with caramelised onion gravy! Great presentation, I like the idea of pushing my fork through the layers and getting a taste of everything.

Pene said...

How do you make a good onion gravy? Please post your recipe. Thanks.

lobstersquad said...

sweet onions are a must, I agree. our morcilla usually has them inside the casing, but I still like to add more.

Sophie said...

I've never seen haggis, neeps and tatties look so glamorous! Only ever dolloped onto the plate.

Definitely agree with Neil - it's a nice idea to be able to get a little bit of each layer each time.

Did you try McSween's vegetarian Haggis? I was surprised how good they are! I'm as happy to eat the veggie as the meat version.

Kiriel du Papillon said...

Hmmm... what is not better with Caramelised onions... hmmm...

nope, can't think of anything. (grin)

I grew rather fond of having a haggis roll for breakfast when I was in Edinburgh. Thanks for the new perspective on this classic dish!

DaviMack said...

It just ... doesn't look like haggis!

Homesick Texan said...

I've never had any of these foods, but I love the names--they sound like dishes out of a fariy tale.

Roxy said...

oh, noooo...I hate when they pile food up like that!

katiez said...

That looks gorgeous! But where do you get you haggis? You surely don't make it yourself... or do you?
Okay, I confess, I love haggis!
BTW, I am getting seriously addicted to having a big spoonful of kama in my apple and yogurt for lunch...

Wendy said...

Adore haggis. I've served it like this as a starter but not as a main - like the big dollops too much! And as much as I love onion gravy I always have the traditional beetroot with this dish.
That said I haven't tried it with the gravy... :)

ScienceMel said...

Fantastic recreation of a Scottish classic! I know I'm going to miss haggis when I move. I think changing the gravy is a wonderful idea...

Tartelette said...

This is so tempting I think I could have more than once.

Kevin Kossowan said...

I'd comment something intelligent, but I'm still in shock.

Saffron said...

Great! Just in august I had the chance to eat haggis in Edinburgh! I really enjoyed it and you made a fantastic dish.

Figs Olives Wine said...

Love the idea of the onion gravy here - if this doesn't sell haggis, nothing can!

Rachael said...

Haggis gets such a bad rap, its nice to hear someone likes it, and someone made a contemporary version!

Pille said...

Neil – caramelised onion gravy is indeed a great addition to many humble dishes, be it haggis, neeps & tatties, toad-in-the-hole or something else.

Pene – you chop lots of onions, fry them gently in some butter/oil for 15-20 minutes, adding a spoonful of sugar half way through the sautéing process to help the caramelisation. Then you add some flour, hot water or vegetable stock, stirring all the time, then season with salt and pepper (and Marmite, if you’ve got some). That’s it. If I’ve got more time, I like Delia Smith's roasted onion gravy recipe.

Ximena – mmm – I need to try your morcilla when in Spain!

Sophie – thank you! MacSweens vegetarian haggis is great – has the closest texture to the ‘real’ think in my opinion.

Kiriel du Papillon – another caramelised onion fan, eh J I’ve never had a haggis roll for breakfast, although a proper Scottish greasy spoon breakfast has some haggis.

DaviMac – I know you’re a vegetarian, and now I’m trying to decide whether your comment is a compliment or notJ

Homesick Texan – Scots have some bonnie words in their language J’

Roxy – I’ll make sure there’s no piles on your plate when you’re coming to visit!

Katie – nope, I don’t make my own haggis. This particular one I brought back with me from Scotland a fortnight ago. And I’m soooo glad to hear about your kama addiction. Let me know when you need to replenish your stocks!

Wendy - believe it or not, I had loads of haggis during my seven years in Scotland (including quite a few festive haggis meals), but the only time and place I’ve seen haggis being served with beetroot is Peckhams!?

ScienceMel – well, thank you for your company at the inspirational haggis meal J

Tartelette – thanks!

Kevin – positive or negative shock??

Saffron – good of you to try haggis!

Figs Olives Wine – hope this sells then J

Rachel – haggis’ bad reputation is really un-deserved!

Jeanne said...

Who would have though haggis could look so appealing?! You are right in saying that its reputation as being ghastly is undeserved, but you have to admit that most ways of serving it ain't pretty! Caramelised onion gravy should be compulsory with all dishes as far as I'm concerned...

Frogprincess said...

Hello Pille - great photo. We're looking at haggis's ovr on our blog www.readersreccomend.blogspot.com
Do you mind if I link up with yoru article and use your photo?

Boo Boo said...

You're a genius! I'm going to try this out tonight, thanks for the inspiration!

Josh said...

I really liked that new way that you talked above. Maybe you and I can be friends and share more recipes, I'm a professional Chief from London Culinary Art, and always fallow this blog.
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